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Objets en Verre, Arts de la Table, Verre à la Flamme
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Laurence Brabant & Alain Villechange
TOYS
Frivolités. Set to make soap bubbles. <br />Various shapes and dimensions. 2005.<br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nixcostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Boucles. Set to make soap bubbles.<br />Dimensions : total height 180mm. 2005.<br /><br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nixcostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Chainette & Couronne. Compositions to make soap bubbles. <br />Dimensions : wingspans 120mm, 180mm. 2005.<br /><br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nixcostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Circules. Spinnings tops with small dots in coloured glass.<br />Dimensions : diameters 15mm, 70mm. 2005.<br /><br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nicostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Rondes. Spinning tops in massive glass.<br />Wingspans 100mm, 180mm. 2005.<br /><br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nicostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Cercle de musique.<br />Dimensions : diameter of the main circle 140mm. 2005.<br /><br />Photographic credit : Xavier Nicostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange
Poppen. Popping toy blown.  2005. Inspirated by one of the Utamaro's best known series contains this bijin (lovely lady). She must be a playful type, for like a child, she blows in a poppen, an ingenious toy-clacker of the Edo period. The trinket is made of blown glass with a hollow stem and an extremely thin and delicate glass membrane covering the outer end. When gently blown, the flexible membrane expands, and when the air is is released or sucked back into the mouth, it returns to its original position, making the distinctive pop sound for which the toy is named. Glass was a foreign importation in Japan and the poppen was first introduced through Nagasaki, where both Chinese and Portuguese are credited with the first blowing importations. As the toy is not seen in the West but can maybe still be found  in some Chinese shops, there's a greater possibility of a Chinese origin.<br />From : Playthings and pastimes in Japanese prints written by Lea Beaten.<br />Sounds and dimensions very various. 2005.<br /><br />Crédit photographique : Xavier Nicostrate. - Laurence Brabant Alain Villechange